Canadian Drone Laws 2021: Flying Drones in Canada

Canadian Drone Laws 2021

Can drones be legalized in Canada? However, the rules have changed. New drone laws for Canada are being developed. This is what you need to know about flying a drone legally in Canada. In this article, Staaker will give an overview of current Canadian Drone Laws.

Drone Laws in Canada

Drone Laws in Canada

Current regulatory landscape

Canada has some of the most stringent drone laws anywhere in the world. You will need a pilot certificate before you can start drone operations. Also, your drone must be registered. Safety protocols should also be followed.

Flying a drone: General Rules

Canada does not accept SFOC applications from tourists who are interested in flying their drones recreationally. Visitors who request an SFOC to fly their drone commercially are exempted from this restriction. In January 2021, this temporary restriction will be reviewed. This page contains more information about this topic.

All drone operations must follow the following guidelines:

  • Transport Canada must register all drones weighing between 250g and 25kg. Before they can fly, pilots must register their drones with Transport Canada.
  • Pilots who fly drones weighing between 250g and 25kg must obtain a drone pilot certificate.
  • Fly your drone wherever you can see it at all time
  • Fly lower than 122m (400ft) in the air
  • For basic operations, you can fly away from passersby at a distance of a minimum of 30 meters.
  • Avoid flying at the location of advertised events or emergency operations.
  • Avoid outdoor concerts, forest fires, and parades.
  • Fly no further than 5.6 km (3 nautical miles) away from airports or 1.9 km (1 nautical mile) away from heliports.
  • Fly far from other aircraft
  • Avoid flying near aircraft, helicopters, or other drones.
  • When flying, respect others’ privacy.

Depending on the type of operation, additional rules may apply. These rules define two types of drone operations: advanced and basic. These categories are determined by distance from other observers and airspace rules.

Advanced vs. basic drone operations

The current regulations define two types of drone operations: advanced and basic. These categories are determined largely by the distance between drone operations and other observers and airspace rules.

These three conditions will be met, and drone operations can be considered basic.

  • Horizontally, the drone can be seen from more than 30 m away from any other person.
  • The drone cannot be flown above the heads of other people.
  • The drone can only be flown in uncontrolled airspace.

If one of these conditions is not met, drone operations will be considered advanced.

Basic drone operations rules

Pilots performing basic operations must follow the rules and regulations of flying a drone.

  • After passing the basic operations licensing exam, you will be granted a pilot certificate.
  • When flying, ensure that you have your pilot certificate and proof to prove your registration.

Advanced drone operations: Rules

Pilots performing advanced operations must follow the rules and regulations of flying drones.

  • After passing the advanced operations licensing exam, you will be granted a pilot certificate. This includes an in-person flight review.
  • Always carry your pilot certificate and proof that you are registered when flying.
  • Fly a drone that meets all safety and assurance requirements.
  • Before you fly, survey the area and keep track of any obstacles, such as power lines and buildings.

Drone flying beyond basic or advanced operations

If you fly a drone beyond basic or advanced operations (e.g., a drone that is over 25 kgs, flying at an altitude greater than 400 feet, or special events or beyond the visual range),

Line-of-sight must be provided to the Minister for Transport. The drone operation must be restricted to the intended purpose once it is granted.

Considerations general

There are additional regulations that must be followed before you can engage in commercial drone applications. These include keeping up-to-date records, following local by-laws, and complying with privacy regulations.

Many drones can retain personal information and may cause interference with private property enjoyment. Drone users must consider how to comply with privacy legislation and avoid privacy-related torts.

Penalties

You could face severe penalties if you don’t follow the law. Here are some examples.

Individuals are subject to fines.

  • Flying without a drone pilot certificate can earn you up to $1,000
  • Flying unregistered and unmarked drones can earn you up to $1,000
  • Flying to places you’re not allowed to fly can cost up to $1,000
  • For placing people and aircraft at risk, you could get up to $3,000

Corporations may be fined.

  • Flying without a drone pilot certificate can earn you up to $5,000
  • Flying unregistered and unmarked drones can earn you up to $5,000
  • Flying to places you’re not allowed to fly can cost up to $5,000
  • For placing people and aircraft at risk, you could get up to $15,000

Future regulatory landscape

Transport Canada recognizes that strict drone laws and regulations can be a hindrance to economic growth. The drone industry and technology are developing rapidly, which means a growing demand for complex flight operations.

This is particularly true for operations beyond the pilot’s visual line of sight (BVLOS). Transport Canada wants to change the drone law regulations to use heavier drones for visual line-of-sight operations (VLOS) and lower-risk BVLOS operations.

Transport Canada proposes a variety of amendments to:

Expand existing VLOS regulations to:

  • VLOS flights by drones weighing between 250 and 25 grams may be conducted in uncontrolled airspace at 400 feet above the ground.
  • VLOS flights may be conducted by drones weighing between 25 and 150 kilograms. They can fly near people, over people, or in controlled airspaces higher than 400 feet.
  • VLOS flights may be performed by drones weighing between 150 and 650 kg.

Incorporate a lower-risk BVLOS framework to:

  • Drones weighing between 250 and 150 grams may fly in some remote and less populated areas.
  • Drones weighing between 150 and 650 kg may fly in isolated areas or less populated areas at a maximum height of 400 feet.

These amendments will require the extension of drone licensing by introducing an additional BVLOS pilot certificate. Pilots must obtain an advanced pilot certificate to be eligible for an operational pilot certificate. They also need to complete a flight review at a self-declared school and meet the requirements of a BVLOS flight.

Transport Canada also wants to include the following technical maintenance requirements:

  • Certain BVLOS operations may require drones equipped with technology to detect and avoid aircraft.
  • Organizations will need to appoint staff and implement strict drone maintenance procedures following applicable drone manufacturer’s manuals.
  • Remote identification features may be required for drones to be tracked, detected, and identified during VLOS or BVLOS flights.

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No Drone Zones

No Drone Zones

No drone zones are areas that prohibit drone flying. It would help if you did not fly drones for any reason.

  • Around airports and aerodromes
  • In densely populated areas
  • In national parks
  • Over border crossings

Transport Canada will only allow you to fly your drone in these areas if you have permission. This page on the TCAA website provides more information about “no drone areas”.

FAQs Regarding Canada Drone laws

FAQs Regarding Canada Drone laws  

Can I fly my drone anywhere in Canada?

The National Research Council Canada has a tool that will allow you to find legal drone sites. Nav Canada also produces NAV Drone. This app for iOS and Android displays the same map with additional details.

Do I need a license to fly a drone in Canada?

Drone pilots should be licensed to Follow the Canadian Aviation Regulations (CARs) to ensure compliance. Drone Pilots must have a valid drone pilot certificate. They can only fly drones that are certified. Are registered and marked. You must not fly a drone less than 250 grams. You don’t need to register your drone or become a drone pilot certificate.

Source: https://tc.canada.ca/en/aviation/drone-safety/flying-your-drone-safely-legally

Do you need insurance to fly a drone?

You don’t need insurance to fly or possess recreational drones less than 25 kg. However, drone owners who use drones for commercial purposes should consider liability insurance.

Can non-residents fly drones in Canada?

Yes. Foreign operators in Canada can fly drones. For any purpose, including commercial or research, they will need an approved SFOC. These requirements are in addition to all drone registration and certification requirements.

How high can I fly a drone in Canada?

Fly lower than 122m (400ft) in the air. For basic operations, you should keep your distance from passers-by at 30 meters. Avoid flying at the location of advertised events or emergency operations.

Source: https://uavcoach.com/drone-laws-in-canada/

Can I fly a drone in downtown Toronto?

Basic drone Controlled airspace is where operations are strictly prohibited. This includes areas. Within a radius of 5.6 km (3 nautical miles) from any airport; and * 1.9 There are approximately 1.2 miles (1 nautical mile) of heliports and aerodromes that helicopters use. These parameters ensure that the majority of Toronto is within the control of airspace.

Source: https://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2020/ia/bgrd/backgroundfile-157070.pdf

Do I own the airspace above my property in Canada?

Canada’s law states that property owners can only own so much air space that they can reasonably use or occupy in connection to the land below.

Source: https://www.mondaq.com/canada/land-law-agriculture/614602/clearing-the-air-around-air-space-rights

Conclusion

You can fly drones in Canada if you make sure to check the rules. Also, this drone law guide will help you find legal flying areas. We appreciate you choosing Staaker.com to be your source of information. We are grateful for your support.

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